TITLE: HOW TO CREATE YOUR
PORTFOLIO ABOUT PAGE

TITLE: HOW TO CREATE YOUR
PORTFOLIO ABOUT PAGE

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The infamous portfolio bio. A source of angst, the inspiration for satire, the most difficult part of your site. Until now.

The infamous portfolio bio. A source of angst, the inspiration for satire, the most difficult part of your site. Until now.

The infamous portfolio bio. A source of angst, the inspiration for satire, the most difficult part of your site. Until now.

The infamous portfolio bio. A source of angst, the inspiration for satire, the most difficult part of your site. Until now.

The infamous portfolio bio. A source of angst, the inspiration for satire, the most difficult part of your site. Until now.

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How to write a compelling About page bio

Yes, your portfolio’s about the work. But it’s also about YOU. What attitude and perspective will you bring to our team? How does your mind work? What makes you different from hundreds of other qualified applicants? Your About page is often the most-visited page on your site for these reasons. So it’s worth spending time on.

What to
include

Your name

Believe it or not, people forget often.

How many years of experience do you have?

If it’s 5+, consider mentioning it. If you’re new to the field, no need.

What are your main areas of focus?

Branding? Product design? No matter how many interests or skills you have, hone in on the 2-3 things you want to do more of in the future.

Where are you based?

It doesn’t matter much these days, but some clients may prefer to work with someone local.

How do you approach your work?

Are you obsessed with detail? Do you thrive in a collaborative environment?

Any notable clients you’ve worked with?

List them within your bio or in a separate section on your About page.

What about awards or press you’ve received?

If it’s a lot, list them out. If it’s just a few, include in a sentence. And link to them!

DO: Feel free to brag on yourself. You get a free pass here.

DON’T: Use too many adjectives. If you find yourself describing everything as “award-winning” and “revolutionizing,” you’re trying too hard.

Play with different approaches

Try different angles for your bio and see what feels natural to you.

Mackey Saturday leads with his philosophy for branding, explaining how he approaches his work instead of describing himself.

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Marina Rachello gets personal with her bio. She lists little quirks about herself, some of which relate to work and others that don’t. It gives us an immediate sense of who she is.

Some designers write their bio in third-person (as Evans Pringle does here), allowing them to share their accomplishments without seeming boastful. It’s a decidedly professional approach – just try not to be too stiff.

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DO: Write like you’d talk. You can refine it from there, but this is always the best place to start.

DON’T: Use a bunch of flowery words or technical jargon in an effort to impress.

The anatomy
of a strong bio

Jot down your main points – before you do anything else.

Jot down your main points – before you do anything else.

Jot down your main points – before you do anything else.

Jot down your main points – before you do anything else.

Timmy is a New York-based illustrator from Texas. He does not have an accent, nor is he a cowboy, but he has been kicked out of Slack channels for using the word “y’all.”

 

 


In 10+ years of freelancing, Timmy has created editorial illustrations for GQ, Rolling Stone, Wired, The New Yorker, Vogue, Bon Apetit, the New York Times and, notably, The Harvard Crimson – an especially gratifying project, considering he dropped out of Harvard his freshman year.

 

 


Timmy enjoys using shadow and light to evoke a mood, convey a message or twist perceptions. After designing forThe Women’s March and a New York Library campaign for young readers, he believes art has the power to change the world.

 

 


A two-time winner of Awwwards Art Director of the Year and a Cannes Lion Mentor, Timmy is very humble. His work has been featured in Fast Company, The Next Web and his mother’s fridge.

 

Give us something to remember

In the end, there is no "right" way to create a portfolio About page. However you go about it, aim to build intrigue, show why you're great at what you do and, importantly, make it easy to contact you.

Further reading

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WHY ARE OUR PORTFOLIO BIOS WRITTEN IN THIRD PERSON?

Aside from personal pronoun preference, is there a reason most of us write our bios as if someone else wrote them for us? Is one way better than the other?

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A SIMPLE PORTFOLIO HACK

Chances are, you’re avoiding your portfolio. You probably know a friend avoiding their portfolio too.

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HOW TO MAKE A GREAT WORK PAGE FOR YOUR PORTFOLIO (A TUTORIAL)

Your Work page is your first impression, telling the story of your work when you're not there to do it. And with Semplice, there are many ways to tell that story.

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